In 2017,  I began the task of printing each part of my body directly onto fragments of handmade paper with ink. Because of the sometimes abstract nature of the prints, I sought a way to keep track of the origin of each impression. It is at that moment I chose to project a grid over me and photograph it, both from the front and from the back. These images became a system of reference for the paper fragments which were marked with the coordinates of the grid on the back. While I could simply have traced a grid over an image of my body, I reflected on the significance of my decision. 

The concept of corporeity in relation to space and time has always been central to my research and I saw in this gesture of projecting the grid an evocation of the expectations of the “system” over the body. Over the body in general, over a person’s multi-facetted identity, but also over my own female body of mature age. So much is contained, constructed, classified and arbitrary in a colonial patriarchal capitalist society.  Where do I stand in such a socioeconomic/cultural context? How is it impacting on who I am? The grid began to feel heavy and overbearing upon me. I felt like pushing the analogy and playing with the image.